Archive Links

Consumer Archive
CU System Archive
Market Archive
Products Archive
Washington Archive
150x172_CUEffect.jpg
Contacts
LISA MCCUEVICE PRESIDENT OF COMMUNICATIONS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MICHELLE WILLITSManaging Editor
RON JOOSSASSISTANT EDITOR
ALEX MCVEIGHSTAFF NEWSWRITER
TOM SAKASHSTAFF NEWSWRITER

Consumer Archive

Consumer

Ace your internship interview

 Permanent link
McLEAN, Va. (8/2/10)--Young adults can gain valuable work and life experience from internships. Some intern positions are paid; some are not. In fact, tens of thousands of students have agreed to unpaid internships this summer, in spite of the bum economy (USAToday.com July 27). Though the Labor Department and Bureau of Labor Statistics don’t track the numbers of paid vs. unpaid internships, a survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, Bethlehem, Pa., found that 90% of employers representing 20 different industries do pay their interns. Whether you’re seeking a paid or unpaid position, here’s some advice from About.com to help you ace your next internship interview:
* Make a good first impression. Be on time and be yourself. Use a strong handshake and make eye contact. * Be prepared. Prepare for an internship interview just as you would for a regular job interview. Select appropriate clothing and conduct research about the company before the interview. Bring a copy of your résumé with you in case the interviewer does not have one on hand. * Prepare for “internship” questions. Since internship candidates often lack professional job experience, many interviewing companies focus on behaviors rather than experience. Be prepared to describe your ability to learn; your initiative; your problem-solving, planning, and organizing skills; and your contribution to teamwork. * Understand the questions before answering. You want to know exactly what the interviewer is asking, so if you don’t understand the question it’s OK to ask the interview to clarify it. * Focus on skills and accomplishments. Talk about your high-school and college coursework, extracurricular activities, volunteer work, and computer and language skills. It’s also important to talk about previous internships and other work experience while highlighting your communication, organization, interpersonal, and problem solving skills.
To learn about a nontraditional college plan, read “Gap Year Before College Can Bring Valuable Life Experience” in Home & Family Finance Resource Center.

HandFF Radio New rules for mortgages and financial regulation

 Permanent link
WASHINGTON (7/30/10)--Sunday's H&FF Radio program presents information about what new mortgage rules mean for home buyers and those looking to refinance, how the new financial regulation bill affects consumers, and other money management topics. The show, which you also can hear later via the Internet, features Paul Berry, Washington, D.C., journalist and broadcaster, discussing these topics with special guests:
* ”How Financially Literate Are Students Entering College?” Mary Jane Kabaci, Ph.D. candidate, consumer economics and financial education, University of Georgia, Athens, Ga., describes what students need to know and what they actually do know. * ”The New Rules for Mortgages.” Dale Siegel, attorney, college instructor, and president of Circle Mortgage Group, White Plains, N.Y., covers what interest rate your credit score will actually purchase, how much income you must show when applying for a mortgage, and whether or not now is a good time to refinance. * ”What Impact Will the New Financial Regulation Bill Have on You?” Gerri Detweiler, author and credit expert, Credit.com, Sarasota, Fla., answers questions about new consumer protections, the significance of the new bill, and what listeners need to know about how it’s going to change the way they—and financial institutions—do business. * ”Save Water, Save Money.” Ken Hair, vice president, engineering and new product development, Water Pik, Ft. Collins, Colo., provides information about the latest technologies aimed to provide both conservation and high performance, easy water saving tips that can affect your utility bill, and where to get more information.
Home & Family Finance is a resource center for personal finance information at the Credit Union National Association (CUNA). The radio show is sponsored by CO-OP Network, the national credit union ATM network; Cabot Creamery Cooperative, maker of award-winning cheddar; and the Defense Credit Union Council and member credit unions, serving those who serve the country worldwide. Home & Family Finance airs Sundays at 3 p.m. ET on the Radio America Network. The show also is carried on American Forces Radio Network. The one-hour program devoted to consumer finance issues is brought to you by America's credit unions and their 90 million members, and is presented by CO-OP Network. CUNA and Radio America are podcasting Home & Family Finance through iTunes, Podcast Alley, Odeo, and other popular podcast library sites, as well as on Radio America and CUNA's websites. For more information, read "Create Financial Checklist to Ease Transition to College" and view the “Refinancing Your Mortgage” video in the Home & Family Finance Resource Center.

Fake check scams target lawyers consumers

 Permanent link
CONCORD, N.H. (7/28/10)--Two lawyers from New Hampshire recently were targets in an elaborate fake check scheme designed to trick them into depositing a fraudulent check and then wire a portion of the funds to a third party. One lawyer fell victim and lost $240,000 in the process (UnionLeader.com July 16). Lawyers, of course, aren’t the only ones targeted. The Federal Trade Commission website says Americans report losing $1 billion each year to fake check scams. Fake check scams come in many forms but have one identifying characteristic: Victims are asked to deposit a check and wire a portion of the amount back. Financial institutions must make funds from deposited checks available after a few days, while identifying a phony check may take several weeks. Victims typically wire funds well before they learn the deposited check is fraudulent; victims are responsible for the amount deposited and the wired funds. Don’t worry. It’s easy to protect yourself from becoming a victim once you understand what to watch out for:
* Field of schemes. Crooks use a number of scenarios via the mail and internet to trick people into becoming victims of fake check scams. Learn to recognize--and avoid--some of the most popular schemes, such as foreign or domestic lotteries and sweepstakes, family emergencies of someone you don’t know, overpayment for something you sell in a classified ad or online, and work at home and mystery shopper scams. * No need to return. There’s no legitimate reason for someone to give you a check and ask you to send money anywhere in return. Never deposit a check from someone and agree to wire a portion of those funds elsewhere * Free to claim. It’s normal to pay for goods before receiving them. However, you should never have to pay to claim a prize, grants from the government or foundations, or be required to cash checks and send money back to an employer.

Fastest-growing careers are in healthcare

 Permanent link
INDIANAPOLIS (7/26/10)--While the economic downturn has hit many job sectors hard, the healthcare industry is steady. Better than steady, it’s thriving. The Labor Department predicts nearly two million openings from 2008 to 2018 for nurses, orderlies and medical assistants alone. The increasing longevity of the U.S. population is behind the more than 50% increase in projected health-care positions. Strong opportunities for employment can be an enticement, but shouldn’t be the only reason behind a career decision. In “100 Fastest-Growing Careers,” author Michael Farr identifies occupations with the highest projected growth through 2018 and offers realistic descriptions of the work. Here are some fast-growing fields outside of healthcare:
* Teachers (32% growth); * Computer network, systems, and database administrators (30% growth); * Market and survey researchers (28% growth); * Heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers (28% growth); * Accountants and auditors (22% growth); * Human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists (22% growth); and * Computer software engineers and computer programmers (21% growth).
For more thoughts on career planning, read “Base School Decisions on Your Teen’s Career Plan” in the Home & Family Finance Resource Center.

HandFF Radio Fun on a budget money tips for young adults

 Permanent link
WASHINGTON (7/23/10)--Sunday's H&FF Radio program offers suggestions for having fun on a budget, helping teens and young adults learn to manage money, summer vacation alternatives, and what to look for in “the fine print” when making a big purchase. The show, which you also can hear later via the Internet, features Paul Berry, Washington, D.C., journalist and broadcaster, discussing these topics with special guests:
* "Have a Lot of Fun for Just a Little Money." Susan Tiffany, certified credit union financial counselor and director of consumer periodicals, Credit Union National Association (CUNA), Madison, Wis., presents ways Home & Family Finance readers and their families have lots of fun on not much dough. Credit union members responded to a “What’s Your Story?” question posted in the online publication. * "More Financial Management Tips for Teens and Young Adults." Samantha Paxson, vice president marketing, CO-OP Financial Services, Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., offers suggestions aimed at younger listeners and their parents. * "Summer Bummer: No Money for a Vacation?" Gail Cunningham, vice president public relations, National Foundation for Credit Counseling, Silver Spring, Md., provides details on why families aren’t spending on summer vacations and what they are doing if they have some money. * "It’s in the Fine Print." Madeleine Greene, accredited financial counselor, author, and retired tenured professor, University of Maryland, College Park, presents reasons to read and verify the fine print, especially for big purchases.
Home & Family Finance is a resource center for personal finance information at CUNA. The radio show is sponsored by CO-OP Network, the national credit union ATM network; Cabot Creamery Cooperative, maker of award-winning cheddar; and the Defense Credit Union Council and member credit unions, serving those who serve the country worldwide. Home & Family Finance airs Sundays at 3 p.m. ET on the Radio America Network. The show also is carried on American Forces Radio Network. The one-hour program devoted to consumer finance issues is brought to you by America's credit unions and their 90 million members, and is presented by CO-OP Network. CUNA and Radio America are podcasting Home & Family Finance through iTunes, Podcast Alley, Odeo, and other popular podcast library sites, as well as on Radio America and CUNA's websites. For more information, read “Find Good Travel Deals Even in a Bum Economy” and “July Financial Fitness Challenge--Lots of Fun for Little Money” in the Home & Family Finance Resource Center.

Perfect storm sinking credit scores jeopardize recovery

 Permanent link
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS, N.J. (7/21/10)--As the U.S. economy struggles with bankruptcies, unemployment, foreclosures, repossessions, and declining housing values, the perfect storm scenario just got more intense. New data released last week reveal that average credit scores have fallen to new lows, jeopardizing economic recovery efforts (CNBC.com July 12). Figures from FICO Inc., a provider of credit scores, paint a bleak picture. Nearly 43.4 million Americans--slightly more than a quarter of the 170 million consumers with active credit accounts--have a credit score below 600 (Associated Press July 12). In comparison, that level historically has been about 15%. Most lenders consider individuals with low credit scores a high risk for loans, mortgages, and credit cards, and--if the consumers are approved for credit--it’s at a higher cost. But tighter lending standards by banks restrict access to credit and are one reason for the slow economic recovery. The trends are concerning:
* Location, location, location: Regions hit hardest by the housing crisis and declining home values--including Southern California, Arizona, Nevada, and others--experienced the biggest downward shift in credit scores. * Subprime on the rise: Roughly 35% of consumers with credit histories have a credit score of less than 650, considered subprime or even nonprime. * Middle tier declining: Consumers with credit scores between 650 and 699--considered moderate credit risk--make up 11.9% of scores, reflecting a drop of about 5.3 million people from the historical average of 15%. These individuals are more likely to try to borrow than those in the subprime range but find it harder to qualify for affordable loans.
One positive trend to note: Individuals with a top score of 800 or higher increased in the past few years, likely because they cut spending and paid down debt. But as more homeowners face the prospect of losing their homes, one foreclosure can cut 150 points off the credit score (USA Today July 12). A “good” credit score is generally 780 and higher. Know what affects your credit score so you can take steps to improve it. Your bill payment history makes up a whopping 35% of your score, so pay all bills on time. Other factors include amounts owed to creditors (30%), length of credit history (15%), new credit, or increased debt obligations (10%), and a healthy mix of credit (10%). Consider paying bills online or setting up autopay for bills to be paid directly from your checking account to assure timely payment. For more information about credit scores, visit myfico.com.

Dont hire a Bernie as investment adviser

 Permanent link
NEW YORK (7/19/10)--Bernard “Bernie” Madoff created a scandal in 2008 when he bilked investors out of their life savings. He also provided a reminder why it’s important to vet the person who’s making decisions--or holding your hand--when it comes to your investments (Dailyfinance.com July 10). If you’re in the market for a broker or adviser, here’s how to make sure you won’t get scammed:
* Make the broker vs. adviser decision. Brokers are paid to do what you tell them. Generally you have to give the OK before they buy and sell your investments. Investment advisers are paid to give you advice and must be registered with either the Securities Exchange Commission or their state’s securities agency. Typically, you sign a contract with an investment adviser giving him or her authority to manage your funds without you weighing in on every decision. * Do your homework. Research broker backgrounds using the free BrokerCheck tool on the Financial Investor Regulatory Authority (FINRA) Web site. FINRA provides information about licensing, how long a broker has been in business, and any complaints filed against the business. For a financial adviser, whether a firm or an individual, use the Security and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Investment Adviser Public Disclosure site. It provides background information and disclosures about regulation violations on the ADV form. You’ll need to ask if your adviser received income from certain funds, as this is not yet publicly available. This is important because you’ll want to know if your adviser is putting your money into investments that may boost his or her bottom line too. * Select two to three companies to meet with. Take the time to interview potential brokers and advisers--you are trusting them with your financial future, after all. Ask questions about services and their investment philosophy. Be sure you understand how they charge and whether fees are based on commission or a percentage of assets under their management. Request references and check them. * Keep your cash. Many of Madoff’s victims gave him their money directly instead of putting it in a third-party financial institution or with an independent broker-dealer. Keep your investment funds in a separate account so you’ll get statements from the financial institution or brokerage and your investment adviser. Plan to compare them and look for any discrepancies.

HandFF Radio offers guidance from ID theft to hiring nannies

 Permanent link
WASHINGTON (7/16/10)—Sunday's H&FF Radio program covers how to recover from identity theft, questions to ask when interviewing financial advisers, how—and why—to select a good nanny, and ways to better manage your personal finances. The show, which you also can hear later via the Internet, features Paul Berry, Washington, D.C., journalist and broadcaster, discussing these topics with special guests:
* ”Idiot’s Guide to Recovering From Identity Theft.” Mari Frank, attorney, certified information privacy professional, Laguna Niguel, Calif., covers steps victims need to take. * ”Getting Started Finding a Financial Adviser.” Chuck Jaffee, senior columnist, MarketWatch, New York, presents questions to ask when interviewing advisers. * ”Nannies for Hire.” Candi Wingate, founder and president, Nannies4Hire.com, North Fork, Neb., explains why a nanny may be the better financial choice compared with a baby sitter, and describes qualifications for a good nanny and the role one plays in a family’s life. * ”How to Be Your Own Financial Regulator: 6 Ways Consumers Can Better Manage Their Personal Finances.” Laura Rowley, columnist, Yahoo! Finance, New York, offers tips for money management.
Home & Family Finance is a resource center for personal finance information at CUNA. The radio show is sponsored by CO-OP Network, the national credit union ATM network; Cabot Creamery Cooperative, maker of award-winning cheddar; Western Corporate FCU (WesCorp) and its member credit unions; and the Defense Credit Union Council and member credit unions, serving those who serve our country worldwide. Home & Family Finance airs Sundays at 3 p.m. ET on the Radio America Network. The show also is carried on American Forces Radio Network. The one-hour program devoted to consumer finance issues is brought to you by America's credit unions and their 90 million members, and is presented by CO-OP Network. The Credit Union National Association (CUNA) and Radio America are podcasting Home & Family Finance through iTunes, Podcast Alley, Odeo, and other popular podcast library sites, as well as on Radio America and CUNA's websites. For more information, use “Calculator: Budget Blueprint” and view the “How to Prevent Identity Theft” video in the Home & Family Finance Resource Center.

E-reader or tablet That is the question

 Permanent link
NEW YORK (7/14/10)--Manufacturers of electronic reading devices such as Amazon’s Kindle and Barnes and Noble’s Nook are engaged in a battle for your dollars. This is your chance to take advantage of price wars between e-readers. But, before you buy, make sure the device will meet your needs as well as a tablet computer like Apple’s iPad or Lenovo’s IdeaPad (The Wall Street Journal June 28). How do you decide? First, some definitions: An e-reader (electronic reader) is a lightweight device for reading content, such as e-books, e-newspapers, and documents. Besides being able to download content, it can do other Web-based tasks. The display is black and white. E-readers can cost between $190 and $800. Smartphones and PDAs that display text can also function as e-readers. A tablet is a laptop personal computer that may allow you to take notes using handwriting on the touch screen. The display is color and you’re able to install any compatible application (app) or operating system. Tablets can cost between $500 and $1,500. When making your evaluation, consider:
* How much you read. If you read a lot, you’ll benefit most from an e-reader, even if you buy a tablet too. E-reader batteries last for weeks. The tablet’s large screen uses technology that makes it easy to view whether indoors or out, a feature of e-readers as well. * Attributes. Look at what the different electronic devices can do. Features vary: Make sure you want what you’re paying for. SmartMoney has put together a handy chart for comparing features. * Content. If you’re going to use a reader for books, magazines, and newspapers, look at both cost and availability of content. You don’t want to purchase a device that won’t let you obtain content you want. No matter which device you get, look for e-book stores that offer content in a free electronic publishing (EPUB) format that any reader can use. * Buying in a brick-and-mortar store. This will give you a feel for the device. The return policies and other benefits may be better than if you purchase it online. * Waiting. More e-readers will appear later this year and prices may drop. Or not. If you haven’t found an e-reader that fits your needs and budget, it may be worth the wait.

Dont write off the U.S. mail remains delivery bargain

 Permanent link
MADISON, Wis. (7/12/10)--Just as predictable as the latest rate increase request from the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) is the negative reaction by consumers to the news (Associated Press July 6). Don’t let the complaining fool you, though. In many cases, the good ol’ U.S. mail remains a delivery bargain. Skeptical? Consider this: The cost of mailing a one-ounce first-class letter has risen from 3 cents in 1932 to 44 cents today. But when adjusted for inflation a 3-cent stamp sold in 1932 would cost 48 cents now. In other words, it costs less to mail a letter today than it did 78 years ago. Even so, consumers more and more prefer e-mail and private delivery services for correspondence and shipping. This shift has caused USPS to rely more on junk mail revenue. It eventually could force the service to radically restructure or even privatize. But until then, and before you choose the Internet or a private shipper, the Credit Union National Association's Center for Personal Finance editors suggest that you compare those options with the U.S. mail for cost and impact:
* Check out the USPS online. The well-designed USPS website allows you to conduct a lot of business remotely. For example, you can calculate postage, buy stamps and supplies for delivery to your home or office, arrange for package pickup, and track and confirm shipments. * Do the math. Letters aren’t the only way the USPS might save you money. The service offers flat-rate shipping that, for example, allows you to send up to 70 pounds in a 12 inch by 12 inch by 5.5 inch USPS box anywhere in the country for $14.50. That’s a lot of fruitcake. Better yet, you could send it to someone with a U.S. military or diplomatic corps address anywhere in the world for only $12.50. * Imagine the impact. Sure you can send an e-mail instantly. But think about the effect on the recipient of your thanks, birthday wishes, party invitations, professions of love and friendship. Taking the time to communicate on actual physical paper in your own distinctive handwriting can give added meaning to your personal message, especially as this kind of correspondence becomes rarer.

HandFF Radio examines student loan debt earning potential

 Permanent link
WASHINGTON (7/9/10)--Sunday’s H&FF Radio program offers advice on getting and managing student loans, what changes to expect in your insurance coverage when you change jobs, how to earn the most you can, and where to look for cruise ship bargains. The show, which you also can hear later via the Internet, features Paul Berry, Washington, D.C., journalist and broadcaster, discussing these topics with special guests:
* “Graduation Debt: Manage Student Loans and Live Your Life.” Reyna Goebel, freelance journalist, CUNA’s Money Mix, Investopedia and Yahoo! Finance, Dallas, Texas, describes mistakes to avoid, new student aid laws, and how to budget for student debt. * “Does Employment Change Mean Insurance Change?” Loretta Worters, vice president communications, Insurance Information Institute, New York, presents coverage options and issues when changing jobs. * “How to Maximize Your Earning Potential.” Eleanor Blayney, certified financial planner, author and consumer advocate for the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, McLean, Va., defines human capital and why it is so important to women especially. * “Cruising for a Bargain.” Susan Tanzman, co-owner and president, Martin's Travel and Tours, Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., presents bargains available on even the best cruise lines.
Home & Family Finance is a resource center for personal finance information at CUNA. The radio show is sponsored by CO-OP Network, the national credit union ATM network; Cabot Creamery Cooperative, maker of award-winning cheddar; Western Corporate FCU (WesCorp) and its member credit unions; and the Defense Credit Union Council and member credit unions, serving those who serve our country worldwide. Home & Family Finance airs Sundays at 3 p.m. ET on the Radio America Network. The show also is carried on American Forces Radio Network. The one-hour program devoted to consumer finance issues is brought to you by America's credit unions and their 90 million members, and is presented by CO-OP Network. The Credit Union National Association (CUNA) and Radio America are podcasting Home & Family Finance through iTunes, Podcast Alley, Odeo, and other popular podcast library sites, as well as on Radio America and CUNA's websites. For more information, read “Create Financial Checklist to Ease Transition to College” and “Cruise for a Bargain” in the Home & Family Finance Resource Center.

Prepare plastic for trips abroad

 Permanent link
NORTH PALM BEACH, Fla. (7/7/10)--Travel can be tricky, particularly when it’s overseas. Don’t leave home without taking measures to prepare and protect plastic cards--and your ability to use them (Bankrate.com June 29). These simple tips could save you hours of frustration and hundreds of dollars or more:
* Give card issuer your itinerary. If the company knows you’re traveling overseas, it won’t place a hold on the card when you try to use it outside the U.S. And if someone uses your credit card number in a country that’s not on your itinerary, you’ll be notified of possible fraud. * Call ahead. Contact the hotel before you leave home to make sure your credit card will be accepted there. Some Europeans have adopted chip-and-PIN cards that include a computer chip and require you to enter a personal identification number (thestar.com June 29). If you’re carrying a card without this feature, your card might be denied. When shopping, ask a salesperson before you get to the cash register if your card will be accepted. And consider printing your train tickets at home, before departure, to avoid kiosks that require chip-and-PIN cards. * Ask about transaction fees. Some cards assess a foreign transaction fee, which can run around 3% and add up quickly if you charge hotel, restaurant, and other expenses paid for in a different currency. Be aware that even if a transaction involves U.S. dollars, some card issuers assess the fee if you conduct the transaction on foreign soil or with foreign entities. If your card charges a foreign transaction fee, take a little extra cash with you and take precautions to keep the cash safe. * Clean out your wallet. Only take the plastic you’ll need, but make sure you have a backup in case your primary card is lost, stolen, or cancelled. And, keep toll-free numbers of your card issuer in a separate place so you immediately can cancel plastic that’s been compromised. Keep all plastic in a secure location, such as a wallet tucked into an inside pocket. * Plan for loss. Consider carrying a USB Flash drive with your credit card information and other important documents in digital form. Make sure the flash drive allows for encryption, which protects your confidential information from identity thieves. Then if your card is lost or stolen, simply decrypt the file on a computer.

Breaches military family resources addressed on HandFF Radio

 Permanent link
WASHINGTON (7/2/10)--Sunday's H&FF Radio program delves into consumer security breaches, buying food locally, teaching your kids the psychology of money, and resources for military personnel and their families. This is a rebroadcast of the H&FF Radio program that first aired March 21. The show, which you also can hear later via the Internet, features Paul Berry, Washington, D.C., journalist and broadcaster, discussing these topics with special guests:
* "Consumer Security Breaches Increase--U.S. Has No ID Theft Plan." Adam Levin, president and founder, I.D. Theft 9-1-1 and credit dot com, Scottsdale, Ariz., discusses why businesses and government should be more protective with consumer information. * "Eat Locally, Save Money, and Strengthen Your Local Economy with Tips from Farmers Market Cookbook." Scott Jones, executive food editor, Southern Living Magazine, Birmingham, Ala., discusses why to buy local and ideas for saving money at the market. * "Kids, Wealth, and Consequences: Ensuring a Responsible Future for the Next Generation." Richard Morris, principal, Resource for Ownership Intelligence Consulting, and adjunct professor, Lake Forest Graduate School of Management, Chicago, Ill., provides information for parents who want to raise children with the financial and psychological skills needed in today’s world. * "Military OneSource." David Julian, a retired Naval commander representing the defense department, Washington, D.C., shares free resources--available 24/7 anywhere in the world--for military personnel and their families.
Home & Family Finance is a resource center for personal finance information at the Credit Union National Association (CUNA). The radio show is sponsored by CO-OP Network, the national credit union ATM network; Cabot Creamery Cooperative, maker of award-winning cheddar; Western Corporate FCU (WesCorp) and its member credit unions; and the Defense Credit Union Council and member credit unions, serving those who serve the country worldwide. Home & Family Finance airs Sundays at 3 p.m. ET on the Radio America Network. The show also is carried on American Forces Radio Network. The one-hour program devoted to consumer finance issues is brought to you by America's credit unions and their 90 million members, and is presented by CO-OP Network. CUNA and Radio America are podcasting Home & Family Finance through iTunes, Podcast Alley, Odeo, and other popular podcast library sites, as well as on Radio America and CUNA's websites. For more information, read “Gouged by Groceries” and “Services, Sites Help Veterans Navigate Benefits” in the Home & Family Finance Resource Center.