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Diebold patents would help ATMs produce revenue

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NORTH CANTON, Ohio (9/26/08)--ATM manufacturer Diebold has received seven patents for its Campaign Office software, which delivers one-to-one marketing messages to ATM users. The software can transform ATMs into revenue-generating business tools, Diebold said. Campaign Office uses member demographics and account information to deliver marketing messages to users. The software’s server includes a database of current member information and a table that defines marketing screens and messages for non-members. Credit unions can use the software to present a student loan offer to a college student, provide interest rates on luxury car loans to business professionals, give renewal rates to consumers with expiring certificates of deposit terms and create targeted messages to non-members. Credit unions also can personalize the ATMs to support specific locales, unique backgrounds, languages and informational and branded service messages. “Delivering the right message at the right time can invite [members] into the branch to acquire additional products and services, helping increase positive teller-member interaction,” said Charles E. Ducey, Jr., Diebold senior vice president of global development and services. Diebold is based in North Canton, Ohio.

Ike prompts free emergency shared-branching offer

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SAN DIMAS, Calif. (9/26/08)--Financial Service Centers Cooperative Inc. (FSCC) is offering free emergency shared-branching services to credit unions impacted by Hurricane Ike. “We’re trying to make it as easy as possible for any credit union affected by the hurricane to continue to service their members,” said Sarah Canepa Bang, FSCC president/CEO. FSCC encourages credit unions, including non-shared-branching credit unions, affected by the hurricane to contact the network for free services. The emergency shared-branching program was developed during flooding in Louisiana three years ago after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.